Curated research library of TV news clips regarding the NSA, its oversight and privacy issues, 2009-2014

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Primary curation & research: Robin Chin, Internet Archive TV News Researcher; using TV News Archive service.

Speakers

Mark Udall
Senator (D-Colorado) Member of Select Committee on Intelligence
CSPAN 09/26/2013
Udall: In the spirit of transparency General, would you agree to declassify the whole history of the bulk collection program? Clapper: Not having read it, i would like to take it off the record. As a general premise, i think we are pushing transparency, and we will declassify as much as we can. I would rather read these documents and get some advice from general counsel about it. Udahl: My time is running out. I have many many more questions
Heather Childers
co-host, Fox & Friends First
FOXNEWSW 09/26/2013
…declassified documents say that the agency (NSA) tapped the overseas communications of senators Frank Church of Idaho and Howard Baker of Tennessee. This because the White House was worried that antiwar critics were being influenced by hostile foreign powers. It was called operation Minaret. According to the documents, other high-profile Americas, like Martin Luther King Jr. and Muhammad Ali, were also being watched. NSA documents do not say exactly who authorized the wiretapping.
Pam Brown
CNN national correspondent
CNNW 09/30/2013
This slide from a NSA PowerPoint presentation shows how analysts use software to create diagrams to chart a person’s social ties, locations at certain times, their traveling companions and other personal information. According documents leaked by the former government contractor Eric Snowden.
Pam Brown
CNN national correspondent
CNNW 09/30/2013
The policy shift intended to help the agency “discover and track” when there is a link between an intelligence interest overseas and a U.S. citizen. The NSA can also draw on material from Facebook profiles, GPS location information, insurance information, property records and other public and commercial sources to better analyze Americans’ phone and email logs. Greenberg: Now we know from these leaks that this is how the government is operating, there is a much broader swath of people, Americans are included in the mix.
Bill Karins
substitute host, Way Too Early
MSNBCW 09/30/2013
More bombshell revolutions in the NSA spying scandal. New documents show the National Security Agency has been secretly gathering information on connections U.S. citizens have made on social media since November 2012. Here is what we know, massive amounts of data on phone calls and the e-mails have been collected by the NSA. This information can be used to pinpoint a person's exact location. Here’s the catch. It can also detect who a person is traveling with at any given time.
Chuck Grassley
U.S. Senator, Judiciary Committee Ranking Member
CSPAN2 10/02/2013
Even with all the checks and balances built into the system these kinds of errors can still occur. Even more unsettling other reports since July have suggested that there have been cases of intentional and willful misuse of intelligence authorities by NSA employees to spy on their spouses and neighbors.
Chuck Grassley
U.S. Senator, Judiciary Committee Ranking Member
CSPAN2 10/02/2013
these disclosures have created broader crisis of trust in the legitimacy of our intelligence gathering methods, generally. In my view, had these programs been more transparent from the start, this trust deficit that the American people have wouldn't be as severe as it is now.
Chuck Grassley
U.S. Senator, Judiciary Committee Ranking Member
CSPAN2 10/02/2013
instances where the NSA employees abused their authorities. It was heartening to see how few cases of intentional misconduct exists but on the other hand it's alarming to know that the possibility of employees engaging in such behavior turns out to be very real. The NSA inspectors general's response to my letter reflected that many of these cases were referred to the Department of Justice for possible criminal prosecution.
James Clapper
Director of National Intelligence
CSPAN2 10/02/2013
Before these unauthorized disclosures we were always conservative about discussing the specifics of our collection programs, based on the truism that the more adversaries know about what we are doing the more they can avoid our surveillance. But the disclosures, for better or for worse, have lowered the threshold for discussing these matters in public. So to the degree we can discuss them, we will.
Patrick Leahy
Senator, (D-VT) chairman, Judiciary Committee
CSPAN2 10/02/2013
Would you agree that the 54 cases that keep getting cited by the administration were not all plots, and of the 54 – only 13 had some nexus to the U.S. Would you agree with that? Yes or no. Alexander: Yes.
Patrick Leahy
Senator, (D-VT) chairman, Judiciary Committee
CSPAN2 10/02/2013
In our last hearing, Deputy Director Inglis’s testimony stated that there is only one example of a case where, but for the use of Section 215 bulk phone records collection, terrorist activity was stopped. Is Mr. Inglis right? Alexander: He is right. I believe he said two, Chairman. I may have that wrong but I think he said two. And I would like to point out it could have only applied…
Keith Alexander
General, Director of the National Security Agency, Chief of the Central Security Service and Commander of the United States Cyber Command.
CSPAN2 10/02/2013
Alexander: He is right. I believe he said two, Chairman. I may have that wrong but I think he said two. And I would like to point out it could have only applied to 13 of the cases because of the 54 terrorist plots or events, only 13 occurred in the U.S. Business rcords FISA was only used in 12 Leahy: I understand that but what I worry about is that some of the statements that all is well, and we have these overstatements of what is going on, we are talking about massive, massive, massive collection. We are told that we have to that to protect us.
Patrick Leahy
Senator, (D-VT) chairman, Judiciary Committee
CSPAN2 10/02/2013
We get far more in the newspaper and we get a crossword puzzle too but we get more in the newspapers than we do in the classified re-things that you give us. According to the article the NSA associates and locates Americans now if it's accurate it appears to contradict earlier representation that the NSA does not compile dossiers of files on the wrecking people.
Patrick Leahy
Senator, (D-VT) chairman, Judiciary Committee
CSPAN2 10/02/2013
Is the NSA compiling profiles or dossiers of the American people? Clapper: In every case for valid foreign intelligence purposes. Let me go to General Alexander. Alexander: Those reports are inaccurate and wrong. Leahy: So the New York Times is wrong in its article? Alexander: Absolutely. Here are the facts. What they have taken is the fact that we do take data to enrich it. What is not in front of the statements is the word foreign. Foreign information to understand what the foreign nexis is of the problems that we are looking at.
Patrick Leahy
Senator, (D-VT) chairman, Judiciary Committee
CSPAN2 10/02/2013
What if anything is accurate in the New York Times article? Alexander: the accuracy is that Secretary of Defense and the Attorney General did approve the supplemental procedures governing communications metadata analysis in 2009. What that allows us to do is use metadata that we have acquired under executive order 12333, and chain, whether it's phone records or e-mails, through U.S selectors to figure out social networks abroad.
Patrick Leahy
Senator, (D-VT) chairman, Judiciary Committee
CSPAN2 10/02/2013
Is what you're doing being reviewed by the FISA court? Alexander: Not in all cases. Some of these cases that deal with executive order 12333 are not reviewed by the FISA Court. Those that fall under business records 215, 702, 3 and 4 would be. So these would not be reviewed, but they are reviewed by the administration and audited by our people.
Dianne Feinstein
U.S. Senator (D-CA), Chairman of Senate Select Committee on Intelligence
CSPAN2 10/02/2013
technology that’s able to piece together data while protecting rights. I listen to this program being described as a surveillance program. It is not -- there is no content collected by the NSA. There are bits of data, location, telephone numbers that can be queried when there's reasonable articulable suspicion. If it looks like it’s something for an individual in the country, it then goes to the FBI
Dianne Feinstein
U.S. Senator (D-CA), Chairman of Senate Select Committee on Intelligence
CSPAN2 10/02/2013
I so regret what is happening. I will do everything I can to prevent this program from being canceled out. There's going to be a bill in my committee to do it. There's a bill in this committee to do it. And unfortunately, very few of us sat on that committee when George Tenet came in, in June of 2001 and said we anticipate a strike, but we don’t know what
Dianne Feinstein
U.S. Senator (D-CA), Chairman of Senate Select Committee on Intelligence
CSPAN2 10/02/2013
(George Tenet came in in June of 2001 and said we anticipate a strike, but we don't know what. We don’t know where. We don't know when. That can never be allowed to happen in the United States of America again. That's the basis for this program. It is legal. We are looking at increased transparency. We are looking to make some changes in it. But we are not looking to destroy it. To destroy it is to make this nation more vulnerable.
Al Franken
U.S. Senator, D-Minesotta
CSPAN2 10/02/2013
problem in this debate., and that's the fact that despite the large amount of Americans information being collected under the foreign intelligence law those laws lack any substantial public reporting requirements. The government doesn’t have to give even a rough estimate of how many American’s information is being collected. it doesn't have to tell Americans how much of their information is actually seen by national security officials.
Al Franken
U.S. Senator, D-Minesotta
CSPAN2 10/02/2013
they have no way of knowing if we're getting that balance right. My bill would change this. It would make the government give annual statistics on the number of America's information collected. and the number whose information is actually reviewed. It would also let companies disclose agreements and disclose aggregate statistics on the number of requests they get and the number of accounts affected.
Al Franken
U.S. Senator, D-Minesotta
CSPAN2 10/02/2013
I'm very pleased to report that yesterday morning America's leading tech companies from Apple to Google, to Microsoft, to Facebook and Twitter to Yahoo!, all of these companies sent a letter supporting my bill urging this committee and Congress to pass it.
Patrick Leahy
Senator, (D-VT) chairman, Judiciary Committee
CSPAN2 10/02/2013
There has to be limits on the surveillance powers we give to the government. Just because something is technologically possible and just because something may be deemed technically legal does not mean it is the right thing to do.
Patrick Leahy
Senator, (D-VT) chairman, Judiciary Committee
CSPAN2 10/02/2013
This summer many Americans learned for the first time section 215 of the U.S. Patriot Act that for years has been secretly interpreted to authorize the collection of Americans’ phone numbers on an unprecedented scale. The American public also learned more about the government's collection of internet content data through the use of section 702 of FISA. Since the committee’s last hearing on these revelations in late July we have learned a great deal more.
Patrick Leahy
Senator, (D-VT) chairman, Judiciary Committee
CSPAN2 10/02/2013
We have learned the NSA has engaged in repeated, substantial, legal violations in its implementations of both Section 215 and section 702 of FISA. For example the NSA collected, without a warrant, the content of tens of thousands of –emails of wholly innocent Americans.
Jeff Flake
U.S. Senator, R-Arizona
CSPAN2 10/02/2013
Flake: General Alexander, last June I questioned the FBI director with regard to retention of data collected under, the metadata under 215. He testified that the data collected under 215 is scrubbed every five years or after five years, i think on a rolling basis. Is all metadata collected under other authorities also discarded after five years?
Keith Alexander
General, Director of the National Security Agency, Chief of the Central Security Service and Commander of the United States Cyber Command.
CSPAN2 10/02/2013
Alexander (answering Sen. Flake 5 yr. data scrubbed?): For NSA, it depends on the type of data. So in the metadata repository for 215, as you stated, aged off after five years by court direction. If there's a report, that, of course, would not be aged off that report will stand just like other intelligence activities.
Patrick Leahy
Senator, (D-VT) chairman, Judiciary Committee
CSPAN2 10/02/2013
NSA violated a FISA Court order by regularly searching Section 215 phone records database without meeting the standards imposed by the Court. These repeated violations led to several reprimands by the FISA Court for what the FISA Court called a systemic noncompliance by the government. The Court has also admonished the government for making series of substantial misrepresentations to the Court.
Keith Alexander
General, Director of the National Security Agency, Chief of the Central Security Service and Commander of the United States Cyber Command.
CSPAN2 10/02/2013
Alexander (answering Sen. Flake 5 yr. data scrubbed?): Within the Executive Order, 12333 metadata repositories, it depends on the size of the repository and the type of data that’s being done. But generally speaking it's five years. There may be pieces of information that we retain longer that are intelligence value overseas that is different than the ones we have in the United States. But that's all that NSA has in those areas.
Jeff Flake
U.S. Senator, R-Arizona
CSPAN2 10/02/2013
Flake: I understand foreign is handled differently. But if you have metadata that’s collected under separate authorities, not just 215, is that bunched together in a way that it’s retained beyond 5 years, how do you separate it? Do you hold it separately. How does that work? Alexander: So NSA, I don’t know of any other programs that would collect metadata in the United States outside of 215. We don’t have any that I know of. And none have come up.
Keith Alexander
General, Director of the National Security Agency, Chief of the Central Security Service and Commander of the United States Cyber Command.
CSPAN2 10/02/2013
Alexander (answering Sen. Flake metadata kept more than 5 years?) : From my perspective. Those would be with other agencies. Clapper: (Overseas) Alexander: The overseas is the one I explained. So, does that make sense? Flake: OK Alexander: So I don’t have any other telephone. There was an old program that we talked about. You know, that was stopped a few years back and all that data was destroyed. That was on email. So we don’t have any. Flake: There’s no more programs that I know of, you would know of them. Alexander: Hopefully, so. Especially after the last three and a half months.
Christopher Coons
U.S. Senator, D-Delaware
CSPAN2 10/02/2013
Coons: the very fact that the NSA can tell so much about a target through detail analysis of non-content bulk data, metadata, indicates to me that there is some privacy interest at stake. Maybe not a Constitutional privacy interest, given the current Constitutional doctrine, but a private interest in the sense that the NSA can cobble together, through these random threads, can weave a profile on a person that can ultimately contain quite private details. Shouldn’t Congress be concerned about protecting that sort of privacy interest against unwarranted intrusion?
Christopher Coons
U.S. Senator, D-Delaware
CSPAN2 10/02/2013
Coons:I will repeat Senator Franken’s solid point that you’ve made some very significant progress in terms of transparency and commitment to response to the Congressional oversight, but temporary changes in policy and practice do not provide lasting assurance. Changes in statute will. Clapper: I completely agree with that. That if these changes whatever they are, are embedded in law, that would instantiate a degree of permanence that our doing it administratively would not.
Ted Cruz
U.S. Senator, R-Texas
CSPAN2 10/02/2013
Cruz: When asked about whether the Agency wants “the records of all americans” you testified “I believe it is in the nation's best interest to put all the phone records into a lock box that we can search when the nation needs to do it.” Besides phone records, what other records of all American citizens do you believe the federal government should be collecting? Alexander: I cannot think of any right now. And there has been. So thanks Senator for that question.
Keith Alexander
General, Director of the National Security Agency, Chief of the Central Security Service and Commander of the United States Cyber Command.
CSPAN2 10/02/2013
Alexander: bulk records that we would need, like the phone. I do think as we look at the phone data we’re going to have to look at how that changes as we bring mobility in. And that has been the question of it. So we released to the intell committees toda,y clarifications so they understood the difference on locational data and those requirements. I do think that right now we’re going to have to evolve as the threat evolves but I cannot think of any. That was a long winded, I can’t think of any. i apologize.
Keith Alexander
General, Director of the National Security Agency, Chief of the Central Security Service and Commander of the United States Cyber Command.
CSPAN2 10/02/2013
Alexander: As NSA previously reported to the Senate House intelligence oversight Committees, NSA does not collect locational information under section 215 of the Patriot Act. In 2010 and 2011 NSA received samples in order to test the ability of it’s systems to handle the data format but that data was not used for any other purposes and was never available for intelligence analysis purposes. In a 25 June 2013 closed hearing with the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence, NSA promised to notify the Congress before any locational data was collected
Keith Alexander
General, Director of the National Security Agency, Chief of the Central Security Service and Commander of the United States Cyber Command.
CSPAN2 10/02/2013
Alexander: In the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court’s most recent opinion, I think it’s called footnote number 5 on the program, the government would also be required to seek the Court’s approval of the production of locational data before acquiring it, under this program. I would just say that this may be something that is a future requirement for the country but it is not right now because when we identify a number we can give it to the FBI. When they get their probable cause then they can get the locational data that they need. And that’s the reason we stopped in 2011.
Ted Cruz
U.S. Senator, R-Texas
CSPAN2 10/02/2013
Cruz: Absent a search warrant particularized to an individual suspected terrorist, does the NSA currently have the ability and access to voicemail content, to text messages or to financial records that are now being collected by the CFPB on millions of American citizens?
Keith Alexander
General, Director of the National Security Agency, Chief of the Central Security Service and Commander of the United States Cyber Command.
CSPAN2 10/02/2013
Alexander: I apologize I’m not familiar, Senator, with CFPB. Cruz: consumer financial protection bureau. (Does NSA have access to CFPB?) Alexander: not that I know of, Senator, no. In fact, if we, to be clear, if we have to go after any U.S. person, it would almost always be an FBI, not an NSA lead. Has to have a probable cause warrant and you would have to go to the probable cause whether it’s under a regular court or the FISA court depending on the type of action . Cruz: And is that answer the same for voice mail content and text messages? Alexander: Voice mail, all content, any targeting of a U.S. person would have to be done that way
Keith Alexander
General, Director of the National Security Agency, Chief of the Central Security Service and Commander of the United States Cyber Command.
CSPAN2 10/02/2013
Hirono: General Alexander, is PRISM the only intelligence program NSA runs under section under FISA section 702? Alexander: Well PRISM was the, well yes, essentially the only program that you know was PRISM under 702 which operates under that authority for the court, but we also have programs under 703, 704 and 705.
Patrick Leahy
Senator, (D-VT) chairman, Judiciary Committee
CSPAN2 10/02/2013
The government has not made its case in bulk collection of domestic phone records is an effective counterterrorism tool especially in light of the intrusion on American privacy. In addition I actually find the legal justification for this bulk collection to be strained, at best. Looked at the classified list of cases involving section 215 and I found to be unconvincing.
Patrick Leahy
Senator, (D-VT) chairman, Judiciary Committee
CSPAN2 10/02/2013
The Deputy Director of the NSA himself acknowledge that, at our last hearing a couple of weeks ago, there is no evidence Section 215 phone records collection have thwarted dozens, or even several, terrorist plots.
Patrick Leahy
Senator, (D-VT) chairman, Judiciary Committee
CSPAN2 10/02/2013
We all agree we have to ensure our nation's security. We also have to restore the trust of the American people in our intelligence community. Fundamentally we have to protect the liberties that have kept us great in a diversified democracy and the envy of countries around the world because of our democracy
Keith Alexander
General, Director of the National Security Agency, Chief of the Central Security Service and Commander of the United States Cyber Command.
CSPAN2 10/02/2013
Alexander: There are cases where the FBI might start a terrorist threat in the United States. If there's a terrorist threat in the United States and they get a warrant to go after that or a FISA then we can use (spicma?) to go after that. we can use this to look at hostages overseas U.S. hostages. We can look at this to track industries because U.S. companies are considered U.S. persons under this law that are the targets of terrorist communications. What we aren’t doing we’re not creating social networks on our families. We aren’t doing that and the insinuation that we’re doing that is flat wrong. I take exception to that.
Patrick Leahy
Senator, (D-VT) chairman, Judiciary Committee
CSPAN2 10/02/2013
Leahy: Is what you're doing being reviewed by the FISA court? Alexander: Not in all cases. Some of these cases that deal with Executive order 12333 that fall under the business records 215, 3 &4 would be. These would not be reviewed but they are reviewed by the administration and audited by our people. Leahy: My time is up. You have raised well – Other Senator: one of the problems we have is this -- with this program is there is not enough transparency. Leahy: Thank you. I worry. You say it's executive authority not FISA court authority. Does anybody have oversight of other than the executive branch? congress too.>> Has this been reported to the congress either the Intelligence (committee's? )
Jim Sensenbrenner
U.S. Representative (R-Wisconsin), Chairman of Judiciary Subcommittee on Crime, Terrorism and Homeland Security
FBC 10/12/2013
Sensenbrenner: You have to do a two-pronged thing. One is the lawsuit against Clapper, who is the National Intelligence Director. And remember he told the senate committee that he gave the least untruthful answer. Well, lying to Congress is a federal crime and he should be fired by the president and prosecuted by the justice department. Now the other prong is doing it legislatively and Senator Patrick Leahy and I will be introducing legislation as soon as we can get this back from the shutdown to properly do the drafting.
Morgan Radford
Anchor/Correspondent, Al Jazeera America
ALJAZAM 10/13/2013
The award is given by former US security officers, and in his acceptance speech Snowden said surveillance programs are a threat to democracy. Snowden: People all over the world are realizing these programs don't make us more safe. They hurt our economy and hurt our country and they limit our ability to speak and think and live and be creative and to have relationships and to associate freely.
Judy Woodruff
Co-Anchor and Managing Editor of the PBS NewsHour
KQED 10/15/2013
the Washington Post" reported today the NSA has collected millions of contact lists from e-mail and online chats, including the records of many Americans. The report cited documents leaked by former NSA contractor Edward Snowden.
Joie Chen
Anchor of Al Jazeera America, America Tonight
ALJAZAM 10/16/2013
Joie Chen: The latest, according to the "the Washington Post" involves hundreds of millions of email contact lists. And, yes, yours could potentially be among them. The latest disclosures again highlight the reach of the agency in it’s efforts to guard against national security threats
Joie Chen
Anchor of Al Jazeera America, America Tonight
ALJAZAM 10/16/2013
Joie Chen: the data drawn from address books and instant messaging contact lists at collection points across the globe could allow the NSA to map out a person's life. The Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act prohibits the NSA from deliberately targeting Americans, whether they are in the U.S. or abroad. And the agency has not been authorized by Congress or the special court that oversees foreign surveillance the so called FISA Court, to collect contact lists of Americans in bulk.
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